Useful Information

  • LGBT Safe Travel Advices in Vietnam

    Health:
    • The number of HIV/AIDS carriers accounts for 0.4% of Vietnam population (which is more than 3 millions) and spreads to all districts in Vietnam, especially in major urban areas and the border zones. The disease has largely been confined in Vietnam to high-risk groups such as sex workers and intravenous drug users which could easily be found at public bars, pubs and clubs around big cities in Vietnam, a dangerous city scam for any tourist.
    • 8 weeks before your trip, please check with your national health center to see whether you need any vaccinations or other preventive measures.
    Laws:
    • Penalties for drug offences are severe and include the death sentence. Vietnamese authorities have strict security measures to combat drug trafficking. All types of drug substances are illegal in Vietnam. A penalty is followed if getting caught using those substances.
    • Prostitution is illegal as is the payment of money for sexual services.
    • Legal age of consent in Vietnam is 18.
     Safety and securities:
    • Drug dealers and prostitution services are available in hugger mugger of which tourists are considered to be their easy-to-be-trapped victims. Be wise at any strange offer at night clubs and bars.
    • Traffic accidents occur often in Vietnam. You should consider the risks of driving a car or riding a motorcycle in Vietnam without a tour-guide, particularly if you are unfamiliar with local conditions.
    • Street crime, harassment, aggravated theft and assault occur, particularly in Hanoi, Ho Chi Minh City, Nha Trang, Sapa (particularly on the train to/from Lao Cai) and Cat Ba Island (near Ha Long Bay). Petty theft, including bag-slashing, is also common in tourist areas, markets, on crowded trains, buses and at supermarkets. The incidence of petty theft increases in the lead up to holiday periods. Travelers are highly recommended to pay close attention to your personal belongings and security, especially during night time and within crowd.
    • While travelling, don't carry too much cash and remember that expensive watches, jewelry and cameras are tempting targets for thieves.
  • LGBT Safe Travel Advices in Myanmar

    Health:
    • Despite the efforts of Burmese authorities and other agencies in reducing the overall rate of HIV/AIDS, there remains a significant risk of contracting HIV/AIDS in certain high risk activities such as unprotected sex and injecting drugs.
    • Remember that AIDS/HIV and Hepatitis B are very prevalent amongst Burmese's sex workers.
    • Mosquito-borne diseases (including malaria, dengue fever and Japanese encephalitis) are prevalent in Myanmar. We encourage you to consider taking prophylaxis against malaria and other mosquito-borne diseases where necessary; and to take measures to avoid insect bites, including using an insect repellent at all times, wearing long, loose fitting, light colored clothing and ensuring your accommodation is mosquito proof.
    • Water-borne, food-borne, parasitic and other infectious diseases (including cholera, hepatitis, tuberculosis, typhoid and rabies) are common with more serious outbreaks occurring from time to time. We advise you to boil all drinking water or drink bottled water, avoid ice cubes and raw and undercooked food. 
    Laws:
     
    • When you are in Myanmar, be aware that local laws and penalties do apply to you.
    • Penalties for drug offences, including those involving "soft drugs", are severe and include lengthy jail sentences.
    • Burmese authorities are committed to combating child sex tourism. There are severe penalties under Burmese law for those participating in such activity. In Cambodia, penalties for child sex offences are severe.
     
    Local customs
    Photographing members of the public without prior permission, especially monks and other religious figures, is considered culturally inappropriate. You should avoid taking photographs near sensitive sites such as military zones, assets or personnel, transportation facilities and government buildings.
     
    Safety and securities:
    There have been very few instances of a tourist being mugged and only the rare pilferage. Myanmar is an extremely safe country for travelers. Some say it is because of the nature of the people. Others say it is because the punishment for robbing from a foreigner is draconian. It is more, however, because of their Buddhism, which bans people from taking what is not given.
    Safety and securities
    • Traffic: For those who choose to rent a motorcycle and drive themselves, be forewarned that traffic in Myanmar is chaotic in the extreme. Chaotic traffic makes motorcycling challenging in the extreme. Roads outside the city vary in condition. If you do decide to ride, drive slowly, stay right, wear a helmet and remember that medical services are limited, especially in the countryside where it is almost non-existent. Only experienced riders should attempt driving in Myanmar.
    • Crime: The government punishes crime, particularly against tourists, severely; it has a hard enough time convincing tourists to go there due to its international reputation. In addition, many locals, being devout Buddhists, are wary of retribution in their next life should they commit any crimes against others. As a result, as far as crime and personal safety go, Myanmar is extremely safe for tourists, and it is generally safe to walk on the streets alone at night.
    • Begging: Despite traditional taboos against it, begging has become a major problem in the main tourist areas such as Bago and Bagan. Children and "mothers" carrying babies are often the ones who beg as they are more effective at soliciting pity. Note that most beggars are part of larger begging syndicates or just after easy money, as tourists are usually seen to be rich. If you really must give, note that most Burmese earn only US$40 a month doing manual labor, giving US$1 to a beggar is very generous.
    • Corruption: Myanmar is one of the world's most corrupt countries. Officials and other civil servants may discreetly ask you for a bribe, or invent issues (missing forms, closed offices, etc) in order to get you to suggest one. Pretending not to understand or asking to speak to a superior may work.
    The vast majority of tourists that visit Myanmar have never faced any of the problems mentioned above.
     
    But always keep in mind some basic travel tips: Be aware of your surroundings and always use common sense.
  • LGBT Safe Travel Advices in Laos

    Health:
    • The government has allowed certain NGO's to operate in Lao that work with the LGBT community in terms of public health. Lao Positive Health Association, founded in 1999, promotes AIDS-HIV education to many different segments of Lao, including men who have sex with other men.
    • The first public LGBT Pride held in Laos was held in June 2012 on the sports field of the U.S. Embassy in Vientiane, with 100 participants; the guests of honor were U.S. Ambassador to Laos Karen Stewart and Dr. Bounpheng Philavong, Director of the Center for HIV/AIDS/STI (CHAS) at the Lao Ministry of Health. Themed "Proud to be Us", the event was organized by Laotian and intergovernmental organizations, including the Purple Sky Network, Lao Positive Health Association (Lao PHA), Population Services International (PSI), the Burnet InstituteFamily Health International (FHI), the Vientiane Youth Center for Health and Development, and UNFPA.
     
    Laws:
    • The Lao PDR is the only landlocked country in the Greater Mekong Sub Region that shares long porous borders with all five neighboring nations. Due to its central location and the rapidly emerging economies of some its neighbors, the Lao PDR has become significantly affected by transnational threats from organized criminal groups.
    • Recent improvements in the Lao PDR's transportation infrastructure have increased the country's utility for the operations of traffickers of all sorts, who systematically use it as a transit route to neighboring countries with vast markets. Easier cross-border movement of persons facilitated by regional integration under the ASEAN's auspice has also been a factor in the escalation of trafficking in human beings from Laos to more developed neighbors, especially Thailand. In most cases, criminals engaged in cross border operations are well organized with sophisticated modus operandi.  These transnational organized crime groups exploit existing loopholes to maximize profits, and diversify criminal activity. This contributes to undermining the rule of law.
    • The current global economic crisis as well as certain geo-political situations have seen significant increases in illicit transnational trafficking through the Lao PDR to the other higher population centers within the region.  While minor traffickers have been arrested, it has been difficult to arrest major traffickers. The trafficking and abuse of synthetic drugs such as Methamphetamine and Ecstasy have replaced Opium as the major threat to public heath, national security and stability. Heroin, Marijuana and Cocaine also pose serious threats. Criminals are getting more sophisticated and the use of firearms and violence has become more common.
    • The UNODC Country Programme Framework for 2009-2013 aims to strengthen the Rule of Law in the Lao PDR, through 1-Enhancing responses to illicit activity and 2-enhancing capacity of the criminal justice sector.  This includes capacity building of relevant government entities and strengthening of regional cooperation on law enforcement and criminal justice matters.
    Local laws and customs

    While you are traveling in Laos, you are subject to the laws of Laos. The Laos legal system and laws can be vastly different from your own and if you do anything against local law then your foreign passport will not help.
    We strongly recommend you not to get involve in prostitution or drug using since it is against local law and our responsible travel code.
    Penalties for possession, distribution or manufacture of drugs can be severe and Laos maintains the death penalty.
    The Lao Government prohibits sexual relationships between foreign and Lao nationals, except when the two parties have been married in accordance with Lao Family Law. Penalties for engaging in prohibited sexual contact or failing to register a relationship may involve imprisonment.
    You must hold a valid passport to enter Laos. Your passport must be valid for a minimum period of six months from the date of entry into Laos.
    When you enter Laos, make sure you get an entry stamp in your passport. Not having a legitimate entry stamp could lead to arrest or a large fine.

    In general, put aside some minor problem, Laos is a very peaceful and safe place for travelers. Open your mind, open your heart and enjoy every single minute.

     
    Safety and securities:
    • Laos has earned a reputation among visitors as a remarkably safe place to travel, with little crime reported. Most but if not all of Laotians remain honest and welcoming. Anyway, as a saying goes “prevention better than cure” you should be aware of some dangers or annoyance you might suffer.
    • For your big bag or suitcase, a padlock is the best to keep it safe when traveling around. When you check in hotel, the first thing to do is to leave your valuables in the safety box with your own password or to deposit them at hotel reception. If you leave your valuable at hotel’s reception box, please remember to put them into a paper envelope and use adhesive tape to cover all the sides then put your signature across the paper and the tape as a seal. This is to make sure you get back what you leave with them and avoid confusing. Remember to get a receipt for your deposit and keep it with you.
    •  Do not bring more than you need when you wander around. Passport, important papers, spare money and valuables should be in safety box. Just bring enough for day use. Depends on your need but around 100USD and a credit card is enough for you to party around.
    • Bag should be wore in the front and do not put the whole junk shop in it. Camera should be held in hand with the strap wore around your wrist.
  • Q&A LGBT in Vietnam

    Q: Is there any law against homosexual activities in Vietnam?

    A: There have never been laws against homosexual activity in Vietnam. Gay venues openly exist and sport official MSM safer sex materials, the government put on an exhibition of photographs called Gay Life which toured all major universities, and the country recognized its first same-sex domestic partner of a diplomat with an official diplomatic visa. As of 2012, the government is officially debating the issue of allowing gay marriage and this open discussion is rippling through Vietnamese society in a fundamental and positive way.

    Q: How Vietnamese people accept LGBT?

    A: For the old generations, LGBT is still a quite new definition, especially in the countryside. However in the big cities, younger generations are now more open-minded and it seems not to be a problem anymore for many to be openly gay.

    Q: Is same sex marriage acceptable in Vietnamese Law?

    A: No, it’s not legal to get married to same-sex partner.

    Q: How is the change in Gay recognition and approval in Vietnam?

    A: In 2001, 80% of the population has claimed being gay is bad and evil. In 2007, 80% of pupils said “No” when asked “Is homosexual bad?” There are big communities of LGBT over the country who have stood up and fought for their right. As such, more and more people have come out of their shell and lived with their real sex.

    Q: What is the customs in Vietnam that LGBT should be followed?

    A: It’s a tradition that couples should avoid sensitively intimate acts in public, and that applies for all couples, same sex or opposite sex.

    Q: Are there any gay-friendly hospitality and tourism services in Vietnam?

    A: There are, now, a number of hotels, resorts, restaurants, bars that offer gay-friendly environment. Contact Sisters Tours team to have the best recommendation for the best gay-friendly services.

    Q: Are there any big events for the Gay community in Vietnam?

    A: Gay Pride event is the biggest event of the year which was first held in Hanoi in August 2012. However, parties for LGBT are often organized by night clubs and bars in major urban areas such as Hanoi, Saigon, Nha Trang, Da Nang. Say the word, and Sisters Tours will make sure you won’t miss the best of LGBT’s night life in Vietnam.

    Q: Are there any social nudity places in Vietnam?

    A: It’s not legal to be naked in public places. As such, there are no social nudity places in Vietnam, not even nude beaches.

    Q: Is Sisters Tours a gay tour operator?

    A: Sisters Tours specializes in providing premium travel experiences to exotic destinations in the Indochina. As we welcome all different types of customers, ideas and business, we do focus our marketing initiatives towards the international gay and lesbian community.

  • LGBT Safe Travel Advices in Cambodia

    Health:
    -       Despite the efforts of Cambodian authorities and other agencies in reducing the overall rate of HIV/AIDS, there remains a significant risk of contracting HIV/AIDS in certain high risk activities such as unprotected sex and injecting drugs.
    -       Remember that AIDS/HIV and Hepatitis B are very prevalent amongst Cambodia's sex workers.
    -       Mosquito-borne diseases (including malaria, dengue fever and Japanese encephalitis) are prevalent in Cambodia. We encourage you to consider taking prophylaxis against malaria and other mosquito-borne diseases where necessary; and to take measures to avoid insect bites, including using an insect repellent at all times, wearing long, loose fitting, light colored clothing and ensuring your accommodation is mosquito proof.
    -       Water-borne, food-borne, parasitic and other infectious diseases (including cholera, hepatitis, tuberculosis, typhoid and rabies) are common with more serious outbreaks occurring from time to time. We advise you to boil all drinking water or drink bottled water, avoid ice cubes and raw and undercooked food.
    -       Avian influenza: The World Health Organization (WHO) has confirmed human cases of avian influenza in Cambodia.
     
    Laws:
    -       When you are in Cambodia, be aware that local laws and penalties do apply to you.
    -       Penalties for drug offences, including those involving "soft drugs", are severe and include lengthy jail sentences.
    -       Cambodian authorities are committed to protecting their cultural heritage. A permit is required to purchase or possess cultural and archaeological artefacts. The penalty under Cambodian law for an unintentional act concerning cultural heritage property is a minimum of six months and a maximum five years imprisonment and a fine equal to the value of the cultural object. An intentional act attracts a minimum of two to eight years' imprisonment and a fine equal to double the value of the cultural object.
    -       In 2011, the Cambodia government changed the requirements applying to marriages between foreign men and Cambodian women. Foreign men wishing to marry a Cambodian woman must be under 50 years of age, and have a monthly income of at least US$2,500 at the time their marriage was approved by the Cambodian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation. They do not apply if both people are over 50 years of age.
    -       Cambodian authorities are committed to combating child sex tourism. There are severe penalties under Cambodian law for those participating in such activity. In Cambodia, penalties for child sex offences are severe.
     
    Local customs
    -       Photographing members of the public without prior permission, especially monks and other religious figures, is considered culturally inappropriate. You should avoid taking photographs near sensitive sites such as military zones, assets or personnel, transportation facilities and government buildings.
     
    Safety and securities:
    -       In comparison to other major tourist destinations around the world, Cambodia is a fairly safe travel destination. Provincial destinations in Cambodia such as Siem Reap and the temples of Angkor are exceptionally safe.  The only notable security concerns include: 1) traffic/transportation safety; 2) petty and sometimes violent street crime in Phnom Penh and Sihanoukville.
     
    Traffic and Transportation
    -       Traffic accidents are not uncommon in the chaotic traffic of Cambodia, particularly Phnom Penh and on the National Routes between major cities. The most common and convenient forms of public transportation are the tuk-tuk and the moto-taxi (motodup), though car taxi is the safest way to move around the city.
     
    -       For those who choose to rent a motorcycle and drive themselves, be forewarned that traffic in Phnom Penh is chaotic in the extreme. Chaotic traffic makes motorcycling challenging in the extreme. Roads outside the city vary in condition. If you do decide to ride, drive slowly, stay right, wear a helmet and remember that medical services are limited, especially in the countryside where it is almost non-existent. Only experienced riders should attempt driving in Cambodia.
     
    Criminal Activity
    -       Like most countries around the world, criminal activity is probably the greatest threat to the tourist after traffic accidents.
     
    -       Outside of Phnom Penh and Sihanoukville, violent criminal activity directed against foreign tourists is quite rare. There have been some bag snatchings in Siem Reap. And over the last several years there have also been a few violent assaults of foreigners traveling alone in the countryside. But at least at this point in time, these crimes are exceptions rather than the rule Generally speaking, provincial capitals such as Siem Reap, Battambang and others are exceptionally safe.
     
    -       Phnom Penh Street robberies of tourists in Phnom Penh, though not common, are reported with some regularity. Most occur at night, near popular tourist destinations and almost always to tourists on the back of a motorcycle taxi or on foot. The robbers are sometimes armed with a handgun and usually only want money. Though the robbers generally avoid applying violence, they will become violent if challenged. The surest way to avoid robbery is to take a car taxi when traveling after dark. If you choose to take a motorcycle taxi, it is best to stay on main roads rather than dark side streets. It is best not to travel long distances by foot after dark. If you are confronted by robbers, do not resist. Give up your money quickly and they will probably leave as quickly as they showed up.
     
    -       Snatch and grab robberies are also regularly reported, targeting both locals and tourists - bag, camera, iPhone/iPad or necklace is grabbed by a passing motorcyclist. Be particularly aware when you first arrive by bus/plane and are taking a tuk-tuk to your hotel. When walking down the street, keep your camera/bag on your inside shoulder away from the traffic side. Most tuk-tuk drivers will advise you to keep your camera and bags in front of you in the middle of the tuk-tuk, not near outside where it can be grabbed. Also note that when riding on the back of a motorcycle taxi, keep your bag or backpack directly between you and the driver, or let the driver place it in front of him. There have been several reports of people pulled off of the back of motorcycle taxis when thieves grabbed the bag or backpack they were wearing.
     
    -       Nightclubs: Some posh Cambodian night clubs draw a dangerous crowd of the rich, connected and armed. The mixture of alcohol and guns can and too often does lead to violent confrontations and gun-play, inside and immediately outside the clubs. As a general rule, this is not the case at foreigner and tourist oriented clubs and bars.
     
    -       Other non-violent, non-confrontational crime does occur, but should almost go without mentioning. Do not leave money or valuables in your hotel room unattended. Do not leave money or valuables unattended on the beaches in Sihanoukville. Do not leave your bags in a taxi or on a motorcycle or cyclo while you go into a hotel to check in. Be very careful of your belongings if you take a prostitute to your hotel room. Be careful of pickpockets in tourist areas, in crowded discos and clubs, particularly clubs filled with prostitutes, and at the traditional markets such as Phsar Toul Thom Pong and Phsar Kandal in Phnom Penh where the pickpockets are often seemingly friendly children. 
     
    Scams 
    -       Tourists and travelers report a few different minor scams in Siem Reap including the milk scam (i.e. bedraggled woman with infant in arms tells you she doesn't want money, just milk for her baby. You buy milk for her at the mini-mart. After you leave she returns the milk and splits money with the mini-mart) and the rice scam (i.e. tout tells you orphanage/school needs rice for kids. Takes you to market where you buy wildly overpriced rice to donate. Tout/vendor split profit. Not as common these days.) But currently the most costly and frightening scam in Cambodia is what has come to be known as the 'Blackjack Scam,' or the "Philippine Blackjack Scam" - passing on the street or in the market a friendly stranger, often a couple, tells you he likes your glasses, shirt, bag, etc. Casual conversation ensues. They invite you to their house to meet family/have dinner/have cultural experience. Friendly card game begins. Before you know it you owe hundreds or even thousands of dollars and are being escorted to the ATM by a group of thugs.
     
    Landmines 
    -       When the topic is landmines is raised, Cambodia is usually one of the first countries to be mentioned, but fortunately, mines are not a concern for the average tourist. The remaining mines are concentrated in border areas (particularly the Thai border), some mountain areas and other old war zones. There are no mines in major cities and towns. The areas around the temple ruins in Siem Reap were demined long ago and is considered quite safe. Adventure travelers to remote sections of Cambodia need to take extra mine safety precautions. 
    The vast majority of tourists that visit Cambodia will never face any of the problems mentioned above.
    Do not do in Cambodia, what you would not do in your home country.
    Be aware of your surroundings.
    Always use common sense.
  • Q&A LGBT in Myanmar

    Q: Is there any law against homosexual activities in Myanmar?
    A: Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) persons in Burma face legal challenges and discrimination not experienced by non-LGBT residents. Same sex sexual activity is illegal in Burma and punishable by fines and imprisonment for ten years to life. The past authoritarian nature of the government made it difficult to obtain accurate information about the legal or social status of LGBT Burmese citizens.
    Q: How Burmese people accept LGBT?
    A: Despite the illegal nature of it, homosexuality and gender expression has become more visible in Burma, especially after the political reforms. Gay and lesbian couples freely cohabit in major cities like Yangon and Mandalay, though they are not legally allowed to marry. The increased media freedom has also allowed journalists to report on the gay and lesbian community.
    Q: Is same sex marriage acceptable in Burmese Law?
    A: Burma does not recognize a same-sex marriage or civil union performed in another nation, nor does it permit such legal recognition internally. However, Same-sex couples have also been able to celebrate ceremonial marriages in major cities without any legal persecution.
    Q: How is the change in Gay recognition and approval in Myanmar?
    A: During the military regime, no organized LGBT political or social life was able to exist. Burma's social mores about human sexuality have been described as being "extremely conservative." Aung Myo Min is an openly gay man and has been involved in the All Burma Students Democratic Front (ABSDF). In 2005 he talked about his coming out process and the homophobia that exists, even with the pro-democracy opposition. Today he is involved with exile Burma human rights organizations, including the Campaign for Lesbigay Rights in Burma. In 2003, Focus Asia (Star TV) aired a story about the Nat Kadaws. The "Utopia Guide to Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar & Vietnam" references "transgender shaman channeling spirits at Myanmar sacred festivals."
    Q: What is the customs in Myanmar that LGBT should be followed?
    A: There are no specific rules or customs for LGBT. However, public intimacy should be avoided when travelling Myanmar.
    Q: Are there any gay-friendly hospitality and tourism services in Myanmar?
    A: There are no hospitality or tourism services that are considered gay friendly in Myanmar. Please consult with Sisterstours Vietnam before your trip in Myanmar so that we could arrange for your best journey here. Within Burma itself, no formal gay bars or LGBT-rights organizations exist. There are only some unconfirmed reports that certain nightclubs in the cities that are a reputation for both heterosexual and LGBT clientele.
    Q: Are there any big events for the Gay community in Myanmar?
    A: Burma celebrated its first gay pride in several cities around the country in 2012, to mark the International Day Against Homophobia, Biphobia and Transphobia.
    Q: Are there any social nudity places in Myanmar?
    A: No, there are not.

  • Q&A LGBT in Vietnam

    Q: Is there any law against homosexual activities in Vietnam?
    A: There have never been laws against homosexual activity in Vietnam. Gay venues openly exist and sport official MSM safer sex materials, the government put on an exhibition of photographs called Gay Life which toured all major universities, and the country recognized its first same-sex domestic partner of a diplomat with an official diplomatic visa. As of 2012, the government is officially debating the issue of allowing gay marriage and this open discussion is rippling through Vietnamese society in a fundamental and positive way.
    Q: How Vietnamese people accept LGBT?
    A: For the old generations, LGBT is still a quite new defination, especially in the countryside. However in the big cities, younger generations are now more open-minded and it seems not to be a problem anymore for many to be openly gay.
    Q: Is same sex marriage acceptable in Vietnamese Law?
    A: No, it’s not legal to get married to same-sex partner.
    Q: How is the change in Gay recognition and approval in Vietnam?
    A: In 2001, 80% of the population has claimed being gay is bad and evil. In 2007, 80% of pupils said “No” when asked “Is homosexual bad?”. There’s big communities of LGBT over the country who has stood up and fought for their right. As such, more and more people have waled out of their shell and lived with their real sex.
    Q: What is the customs in Vietnam that LGBT should be followed?
    A: It’s a tradition that couples should avoid sensitively intimate acts in public, and that applies for all couples, same sex or opposite sex.
    Q: Are there any gay-friendly hospitality and tourism services in Vietnam?
    A: There are, now, a number of hotels, resorts, restaurants, bars that offer gay-friendly environment. Contact Sisterstours team to have the best recommendation for the best gay-friendly services.
    Q: Are there any big events for the Gay community in Vietnam?
    A: Gay Pride event is the biggest event of the year which firstly held in Hanoi in August 2012. However, parties for LGBT are oftenly organized by night clubs and bars in major urban areas such as Hanoi, Saigon, Nha Trang, Da Nang. Say your word, and Sisterstours will make sure you won’t miss the best of LGBT’s night life in Vietnam.
    Q: Are there any social nudity places in Vietnam?
    A: It’s not legal to be naked in public places. As such, there are no social nudity places in Vietnam, not even nude beaches.
    Q: Is Sisterstours a gay tour operator?
    A: Sisterstours specializes in providing premium travel experiences to exotic destinations in the Indochina. As we welcome all different types of customers, ideas and business, we do focus our marketing initiatives towards the international gay and lesbian community.
  • Q&A LGBT in Laos

    Q: Is there any law against homosexual activities in Laos?
    A: Homosexuality is legal in Laos, however, it is very difficult to assess the current state of acceptance and violence that lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) citizens face, because the government does not allow those who are not associated with the government to conduct polls on human rights. 
    Q: How Lao people accept LGBT?
    A: Gays are becoming quite visible within Lao society and gay business entrepreneurs and managers are setting the trend with stylish boutique operations that compliment the diversity of local cultures. The Lao are moderate in their behavior and while it's natural for friends to casually hug or hold hands, public displays of romantic affection are against the norm. Novice monks, while less formal in their interpersonal relationships than in Thailand, are still to be accorded proper respect. Please respect local laws and customs during your travels in Laos.
    Q: Is same sex marriage acceptable in Lao Law?
    A: Laos does not recognize same-sex marriages, nor any other form of same-sex union. There have been no known debates of such unions being legalized in the near future, though this does not imply that the government or Laotians are opposed to such unions, the topic has simply yet to come up for debate.
    Q: How is the change in Gay recognition and approval in Laos?
    A: Gay foreigners visiting Laos in the 1990s sometimes reported the existence of a taboo associated with foreigners, that made it hard to interact with Laos, except discreetly at night. Today, the government does block access to LGBT themed webpages and discussions about LGBT issues in the media are rare, beyond transsexuals who are quite visible in the culture as entertainment. However, the government generally tolerates, or simply ignores, LGBT people unless they campaign for LGBT rights or judged by the government to be too publicly immodest or indecent. Tolerance for LGBT is, as is often the case, stronger in the urban cities then in the rural neighborhoods.
    Q: What is the customs in Laos that LGBT should be followed?
    A: Harsh penalties, including fines and imprisonment, have in the past been imposed on Lao citizens who were seen to breach the social norm or become inappropriately intimate with foreigners.
    Q: Are there any gay-friendly hospitality and tourism services in Laos?
    A: Don't travel to Laos expecting to find a sophisticated gay scene. Instead, enjoy the gentle and familial tolerance towards local gays who have begun to stand out and contribute their talents to trendy cafés, pubs, boutique hotels, galleries, restaurants and craft shops popping up in the two main cities. Gay or Lesbian are welcomes, there some excellent restaurants, hotels, bars, night clubs, music and Karaoke pubs which play mix Lao, Thai & western music. There are several easy to find bar restaurants(close by midnight) popular with tourist are Kop Chai Dur, Chess Café and Bo Ben Yang bar.
    Q: Are there any big events for the Gay community in Laos?
    A: The first public LGBT Pride held in Laos was held in June 2012 on the sports field of the U.S. Embassy in Vientiane, with 100 participants
    Q: Are there any social nudity places in Laos?
    A: It’s not legal to be naked in public places. As such, there are no social nudity places in Vietnam, not even nude beaches.